THE ROBBERY OF BRINK, PART SIXTEEN

May 19, 2021 hello 0 Comment

THE ROBBERY OF BRINK, PART SIXTEEN

After being injured on Wednesday, 16 June 1954, O’Keefe was nowhere to be found. Finally, on Sunday, 1 August 1954, he was apprehended at Leicester, Massachusetts, and handed over to the Boston police, who captured him for violating probation on a gun-transporting charge. O’Keefe was sentenced to serve two years and three months in prison on Thursday, 5 August 1954. As a precautionary measure, he was imprisoned in the Hampden Settlement Prison at Springfield, Massachusetts, rather than the Suffolk Settlement Prison in Boston.  

The swindler associate of O’Keefe, who reportedly had helped him in catching Costa for ransom and was present during the gunning scrape between Baker and O’Keefe, vanished on Wednesday, 3 August 1954. The missing swindler’s sedan was located near his residence; nonetheless, his whereabouts remain a mystery. 

Gangland associates in Boston have generally wondered that the swindler was slaughtered because of his relationship with O’Keefe.    

The remaining associates of the thievery mob also were having their difficulties. There was a man named James Ignatius Faherty, a veteran robber. His name had been stated in gangland discussions in January 1950 regarding a “score” on which the gang associates used binoculars to observe their planned victims count huge sums of money. Faherty had been interviewed on the robbery’s night. He asserted he had been drinking in different taverns from about 17:10 local time until 19:45 local time. Some individuals alleged to have seen him. The persisting investigation, nonetheless, had connected him with the mob.  

In 1936 and 1937, respectively, Faherty was indicted of armed robbery violations. He was paroled in 1994 and stayed on parole through March 1954, when “calamity” befell him. Because of the unsatisfactory conduct, refusal to get employment, drunkenness, and association with recognizing lawbreakers, his parole was annulled, and he made his way back to the Massachusetts State Jail. Two hundred and ten days later, however, he was once more paroled.